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Les événements de octobre 2021

séminaire

  • Séminaires LPNC

    • Mardi 26 octobre 13:00-14:00 - Clara Martin - Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language

      Bilinguals learning novel written words : Influence of the orthographic system of the other language

      Résumé : Monolingual readers of deep orthographies –as compared to shallow orthographies– rely on larger orthographic and phonological units when learning novel written words, which boosts their performance (Marinelli, Zoccolotti, & Romani, 2020).
      In the case of bilingual readers, we know that bilinguals who master one language with a deep orthography rely on larger units (compared to bilinguals who master two languages which both have shallow orthographies), even when reading in their other-shallow-orthography (Lallier & Carreiras, 2018). This suggests that a deep language influences reading habits in the –shallow– other language.
      In the present project, we explore whether the opacity of the orthographic system of one language influences novel word learning in the other language –as it is the case for reading habits–, in bilingual readers.
      In experiment 1, we explore whether bilingual adults learning novel written words in a shallow first language (Spanish) differ in performance depending on whether they also read in a deep (English) or a shallow (Basque) second language. In experiment 2, we explore whether bilingual adults learning novel written words in a deep second language (English) differ in performance depending on whether they also read in a deep (French) or shallow (Spanish) first language.
      In both experiments, we show that bilinguals who master a language with a deep orthography (being their first or second language) rely on larger orthographic units and thus learn more novel words. Those bilinguals are also less affected by word inconsistency during learning. Those results reveal a strong influence of the orthographic systems of the two languages of a bilingual, not only during language perception and production but also during word learning.

      Article

  • Séminaires Equipe PSM

    • Mardi 26 octobre 13:00-14:00 - Clara Martin - Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language

      Bilinguals learning novel written words : Influence of the orthographic system of the other language

      Résumé : Monolingual readers of deep orthographies –as compared to shallow orthographies– rely on larger orthographic and phonological units when learning novel written words, which boosts their performance (Marinelli, Zoccolotti, & Romani, 2020).
      In the case of bilingual readers, we know that bilinguals who master one language with a deep orthography rely on larger units (compared to bilinguals who master two languages which both have shallow orthographies), even when reading in their other-shallow-orthography (Lallier & Carreiras, 2018). This suggests that a deep language influences reading habits in the –shallow– other language.
      In the present project, we explore whether the opacity of the orthographic system of one language influences novel word learning in the other language –as it is the case for reading habits–, in bilingual readers.
      In experiment 1, we explore whether bilingual adults learning novel written words in a shallow first language (Spanish) differ in performance depending on whether they also read in a deep (English) or a shallow (Basque) second language. In experiment 2, we explore whether bilingual adults learning novel written words in a deep second language (English) differ in performance depending on whether they also read in a deep (French) or shallow (Spanish) first language.
      In both experiments, we show that bilinguals who master a language with a deep orthography (being their first or second language) rely on larger orthographic units and thus learn more novel words. Those bilinguals are also less affected by word inconsistency during learning. Those results reveal a strong influence of the orthographic systems of the two languages of a bilingual, not only during language perception and production but also during word learning.

      Article

  • Séminaires Equipe Mémoire et développement

    • Mardi 26 octobre 13:00-14:00 - Clara Martin - Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language

      Bilinguals learning novel written words : Influence of the orthographic system of the other language

      Résumé : Monolingual readers of deep orthographies –as compared to shallow orthographies– rely on larger orthographic and phonological units when learning novel written words, which boosts their performance (Marinelli, Zoccolotti, & Romani, 2020).
      In the case of bilingual readers, we know that bilinguals who master one language with a deep orthography rely on larger units (compared to bilinguals who master two languages which both have shallow orthographies), even when reading in their other-shallow-orthography (Lallier & Carreiras, 2018). This suggests that a deep language influences reading habits in the –shallow– other language.
      In the present project, we explore whether the opacity of the orthographic system of one language influences novel word learning in the other language –as it is the case for reading habits–, in bilingual readers.
      In experiment 1, we explore whether bilingual adults learning novel written words in a shallow first language (Spanish) differ in performance depending on whether they also read in a deep (English) or a shallow (Basque) second language. In experiment 2, we explore whether bilingual adults learning novel written words in a deep second language (English) differ in performance depending on whether they also read in a deep (French) or shallow (Spanish) first language.
      In both experiments, we show that bilinguals who master a language with a deep orthography (being their first or second language) rely on larger orthographic units and thus learn more novel words. Those bilinguals are also less affected by word inconsistency during learning. Those results reveal a strong influence of the orthographic systems of the two languages of a bilingual, not only during language perception and production but also during word learning.

      Article

  • Séminaires Equipe Langage

    • Mardi 26 octobre 13:00-14:00 - Clara Martin - Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language

      Bilinguals learning novel written words : Influence of the orthographic system of the other language

      Résumé : Monolingual readers of deep orthographies –as compared to shallow orthographies– rely on larger orthographic and phonological units when learning novel written words, which boosts their performance (Marinelli, Zoccolotti, & Romani, 2020).
      In the case of bilingual readers, we know that bilinguals who master one language with a deep orthography rely on larger units (compared to bilinguals who master two languages which both have shallow orthographies), even when reading in their other-shallow-orthography (Lallier & Carreiras, 2018). This suggests that a deep language influences reading habits in the –shallow– other language.
      In the present project, we explore whether the opacity of the orthographic system of one language influences novel word learning in the other language –as it is the case for reading habits–, in bilingual readers.
      In experiment 1, we explore whether bilingual adults learning novel written words in a shallow first language (Spanish) differ in performance depending on whether they also read in a deep (English) or a shallow (Basque) second language. In experiment 2, we explore whether bilingual adults learning novel written words in a deep second language (English) differ in performance depending on whether they also read in a deep (French) or shallow (Spanish) first language.
      In both experiments, we show that bilinguals who master a language with a deep orthography (being their first or second language) rely on larger orthographic units and thus learn more novel words. Those bilinguals are also less affected by word inconsistency during learning. Those results reveal a strong influence of the orthographic systems of the two languages of a bilingual, not only during language perception and production but also during word learning.

      Article

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